Set-piece analysis: Almere City offensive corners

One of the things that I wanted to do more in 2021 was to explore more. By exploring I mean looking at leagues that I didn’t look at before, especially leagues that do not figure in Europe. I’m looking to new leagues and leagues beyond the top tier, but somehow forget to analyse teams in the second tier in the Netherlands. So today I’m doing exactly that.

In this set-piece analysis, I will look at the attacking corner routines of Almere City FC. They are not only a very interesting team with progressive ideas, they are also hugely ambitious and would like to make their debut in the Eredivisie in the years to follow, so the project is definitely interesting to follow.

Almere City vs Helmond Sport

In the video above we Almere City in their game against Helmond Sport. The corner is taken from the right by a left-footed player, which means the ball will swing in rather than swing our. This also means that the ball is more likely to be delivered to the six-yard box and this can be seen by the number of players in the six-yard box.

On the right, we have a player close to the corner taker, just on the edge of the penalty are. In the six-yard box, we see two players. Just outside the box we have four players who all will move to the six-yard box as the corner is taken, but they will all asume different positions: Front post, central zones and far post.

As soon as the ball is kicked we see three players move to the front post, while one player remains in the central zone in the six-yard box. By doing so, the four players create space at the far post for the player there to attack a cross. The ball is headed to the far post and although it’s a difficult header, the ball is converted into a goal.

Almere City vs FC Dordrecht

In the video above we Almere City in their game against FC Dordrecht. The corner is taken from the left by a left-footed player, which means the ball will swing out rather than swing in. This also means that the ball is more likely to be delivered between the penalty spot and the six-yard box with deep-positioned runners.

On the left, we have a player close to the corner taker, just on the edge of the penalty area. In the six-yard box, we see two players. On the edge of the penalty area, we have three players who all will move to the six-yard box as the corner is taken, in the central zones and in the far post zones.

As soon as the ball is kicked we see three players/runners move to the central zones and to the far post, while the two players in the six-yard box remain in their positions. The opposition plays a second line of zonal marking, which makes it easier for the runners to get between the lines and actually score this goal.

Almere City vs Go Ahead Eagles

In the video above we Almere City in their game against Go Ahead Eagles. The corner is taken from the right by a left-footed player, which means the ball will swing in rather than swing out. This also means that the ball is more likely to be delivered in the six-yard box, which you can notice with the position of the players in the penalty are. In this case it’s quite obvious that the corner will be taken short.

On the right, we have a player very close to the corner taker for the short pass option which takes place. Outside the penalty area, we have a player tasked with the cleared balls and the first line of rest-defence in case of a counter-attack by Go Ahead Eagles. There is one player in the six-yard box against a two player zonal structure. On the edge of the penalty area, we have one player and, we have three players who all will move to the six-yard box as the corner is taken, in the central zones and in the far post zones.

The ball is taken short and the left-footed player receives the ball back and crosses the ball with his left foot into the central zones, but the ball is headed to the far post – after which it is quite easy for Almere City to score a goal. By taking the ball short, the defence organisation has been divided and Almere City does take advantage to this fact.

Almere City vs Excelsior Rotterdam

In the video above we Almere City in their game against Excelsior. The corner is taken from the right by a left-footed player, which means the ball will swing in rather than swing out. This also means that the ball is more likely to be delivered in the six-yard box, which you can notice with the position of the players in the penalty are.

On the right, we have a player close to the corner taker just outside the penalty area. There is one player in the six-yard box against a two player zonal structure. On the edge of the penalty area we have one player and, we have three players who all will move to the six-yard box as the corner is taken, in the central zones, front post zones and in the far post zones. Excelsior have a six player zonal structure.

As soon as the ball is kicked we see one runner go to the front post zone, while the others remain in the central zones and even the far post zones. The player deeper in the penalty box remains on his position and anticipates the cleared ball. The cross goes the front post and the runner in that position gets on the end of it and heads it towards the far post: another goal for Almere City.

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